Abstracts – Biographies

efsli 2018

Page being updated

Download/view full Abstracts & Bios >>> here PDF <<<

TED talk presentations
MaryFaith Autumn (UK)

MaryFaith Autumn (UK)

first studied interpreting in 1979 in Denver, Colorado and in 2009 was awarded an MA Interpreting by the University of Leeds. She studied with seminal scholars at Gallaudet University in 2011-12. MaryFaith began freelance interpreting in 2001 but has applied her skills in various roles: chaplain at a hospital with a Deaf in-patient unit, facilitating personal/spiritual development groups with Deaf participants, and a voluntary placement at a school in Nigeria. In her leisure time MaryFaith relishes walks with her dog, sketching, and playing the piano. A committed Quaker, she is active at local and national levels.

What’s All This Business?

An exploration of interpreted talk in the workplace This study analyses the interactions of participants in six meetings of a community service organisation. These interactions are not only complicated by such identity membership categories as whether the interlocutors are male or female or the mixture of occupational statuses they hold within the organisation, but most significantly because the participants in these meetings are from two distinct linguistic and cultural communities and all their communication is interpreted between these two languages. By examining this peculiar, interpreted discourse and describing interpreter behaviour, particularly as regards turn design and turn-taking, it is possible to determine how control over interlocutors’ contributions is managed and to uncover the interpreter’s function with regard to the process of power management. Interpreter-mediated interactions between deaf and hearing individuals allowed for the investigation of the relationship between turn-taking and power. It describes turn-taking behaviours of deaf and hearing participants who have varying degrees of asymmetrical relationships; it views the means by which power is held, shared and passed in interactions; it evidences how the activities and business of the institution were accomplished in and through talk; and, it demonstrates that the talk within these meetings can be identified as Institutional Talk. The examination of how turn-taking organisation was managed by the interpreters, viewed through the lens of power in discourse according to Fairclough (2001), and the types of power as related to management styles according to Vine (2004), this study uncovers the interpreter’s function with regard to the process of power. Documentation of the BSL used by native speakers and professional, fluent interpreters, also makes it possible to glean insights towards the identification of a genre of business discourse in BSL.

Malin Tesfazion (Sweden)

Malin Tesfazion (Sweden)

is a lecturer in Sign Language interpreting at the Institute for Interpreting and Translation studies, Stockholm University. Malin has been an active sign language interpreter for 25 years mainly working for the interpreting unit at Stockholm university. She teaches Sign Language interpreting at the BA program in Sign Language interpreting. Malin is currently finishing her MA-thesis at Stockholm University and the topic is interpreting for hearing signers. This presentation will be based on her Master’s thesis.

Cooperation challenges: Signed Language interpreters working with deaf and hearing signers

Signed language interpreting in employment settings contains several challenges for interpreters. One of them is to cooperate with both deaf and hearing signers. Hearing persons with varied fluency in signed language regularly participate in interpreted employment and educational settings in Sweden. For different reasons, these hearing participants sometimes choose to sign in interpreted communication with the deaf college. The choice of language used (i.e. signed language when hearing) contributes to a complex interpreting situation and the cooperation might be challenging for both the signer and the interpreter. The hearing signer must endure to hear the spoken interpretation of his/her own words and the interpreter has to find words the hearing signer is comfortable with and also be responsive to what terms and expressions the hearing signer prefer. If left unattended these challenges may lead to a worse communication situation for all participants. The aim of this presentation is to shed light on the topic of how interpreters can cooperate mutually with hearing signers as well as deaf signers. The cooperative principles of interpretation (Napier 2007), which derives from the framework of Grice’s cooperative principles of conversation (1975), are used as a framework for the study. The concept of signposting (Smith 2015) is also transmittable to this interpreting setting.

Marija Kefelja (Croatia)

Marija Kefelja (Croatia)

is an employee of Association of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Zagreb, since 2017. She has experience working in educational, employment, medical and social settings, as well as interpreting on Croatian public television. She has four years of interpreter experience. What started as a hobby grew in something much more when she deeply fell in love with Croatian sign language. Having degree in philosophy and history, she is showing special interest in deaf culture and history, as well as in field of ethics. She is continuously trying to explore and connect these fields.

Perspective on interpreting in job interviews

Ethics could never be an ideal system that is perfect in theory, but useless in practice. It is essential that the theory matches the practice. Since ancient times, philosophers have expressed the idea that ethical behavior is acceptable from a point of view that could be seen as universal one. However, circumstances can sometimes change the reasons and we can say something is good or bad, depending on its consequences. That leads us to utilitarianism, where decisions should be made depending on whether they have positive or negative consequences. Due to utilitarian criteria, the proper course of action is one that maximizes a positive effect. Having in mind Croatian practice, sign language interpreting often requires such an attitude. The focus should remain on the goal. Since in practical ethics it’s impossible to keep list of rules, it should be done so that we do no harm and, even more, that we ultimately achieve the best outcome for the people affected by our action. Some of the ethical questions that could be relevant when it comes to job interview interpreting might be: 1) What if the interpreter knows the information that can do harm- is it acceptable to keep it for himself? 2) What if the interpreter has the information he believes could be of significant help- should he reveal it? Since ethically correct attitudes should be made with due regard to all relevant circumstances, because morality is not the same for all social groups, the answers to these questions must be sought in the Deaf community, considering their experiences. A sample of respondents who will answer these questions will be 100 deaf persons, and research would, besides providing insight into their standpoint, also show whether the answers differ depending on the age of respondents.

Veera Wusu (Finland)

Veera Wusu (Finland)

Sign language interpreter working mainly in educational and work-related settings in Via Sign Language Sector Cooperative in Middle Finland. Student in Development of Interpreting Practices Master’s program in Humak University of Applied Sciences.

Workplace interpreting for deaf professionals: Higher demands for interpreters and the service structure

As the number of highly educated deaf people has increased, the demands on sign language interpreting has grown both in educational settings and in workplaces. The demand is directed both to the skills and abilities of the interpreters and to the service structures. In Finland, interpreting services are centrally coordinated by the National Pensions Institute (Kela). Deaf clients don’t automatically have the possibility to influence on the choice of which interpreter is working at their work-related assignments even though the situation is expected to improve in the beginning of 2018. This paper discusses workplace interpreting on settings where the deaf person is working as a specialist of his/her field. It will present expectations deaf clients, hearing co-workers and interpreters have about these situations. The paper’s aim is two-fold: It describes the expectations about the interpreters’ qualities (skills, abilities, even personality) and the expectations towards the service provider. The paper is based on ongoing master’s thesis research in the Humak University of Applied Sciences. The data contains six semi-structural interviews of deaf clients, their hearing colleagues and interpreters. The research is carried out in the spirit of co-production which is rather new perspective on sign language services in Finland. The research is aiming to shed light on how workplace interpreting could be arranged in more quality enabling manner in the current Finnish framework.

Nóra Ungár (Hungary)

Nóra Ungár (Hungary)

is a freelance SL interpreter and current president of the Hungarian Association of SL Interpreters. She earned her vocational qualification in 1997, and her master’s degree in Anthropology in 2004. Between 2004 and 2009 she actively participated as project manager in the establishment of the Hungarian SL Interpreting Network, and the development of SL interpreter training and SL course curricula. She has European Masters in Conference Interpreting, Hungarian (A), English (B) and Italian (C) being her working languages. Currently she is pursuing a PhD in Translation Studies at the Department of Translation and Interpreting of ELTE University.

Is the SL Interpreter an Asset or an Accessory?

The assignments of SL interpreters are heavily determined by the social status of their clients. When it comes to interpreting in employment the settings reflect labour policies and opportunities of Deaf and Hard of Hearing people in our societies. In Hungary, according to the census of 2011, 20% of Deaf people were employed. When we’re looking at qualifications, 37% has completed primary education, 15% had a qualification from secondary level, and only 5% attained a third level degree. Naturally the interpreting assignments in employment reflect this spectrum, and also the expectations of employers and clients about the role of the interpreter. This presentation aims to highlight the different roles interpreters have to play – from living prop to mediator between languages and cultures, from social worker to counsellor and legal advisor – depending on the level of employability, job ranking, self representation and expectations of Deaf clients and also the employers. The lower our customers are in the ranks of careers, the higher is their need to assistance. The presentation will showcase 5 scenarios focusing on the professional and ethical dilemmas interpreters face while complying with the often conflicting demands. The scenarios are taken from real life cases, collected from Hungarian SL interpreters and Deaf clients as part of an ongoing PhD research into SL interpreters’ role expectations, coping strategies and how to prepare students during the training of community interpreters. The dilemmas of professional conduct and ethics will be discussed in light of the theoretical framework of interpreting ethics currently established by international professional organisations (WASLI, AIIC, EULITA), and discourses established by academics of Interpreting and Translation Studies (e.g. Baker 1992, Schäffner and Holmes 1996, Gile 2009, Mikkelson 2000, Edwards 1995, Russel 2002 and Mindess 2004).

Emeline Arcambal (France)

Emeline Arcambal (France)

is a French sign language interpreter working in Paris. She was trained at ESIT where she is now teaching. At the same time, she is involved in a PhD in translation studies program supervised by Fayza El Qasem at ESIT (Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle). Her research interests include the role and the impact of the interpreter in different contexts, as well as issues concerning Ethic.

The sign language interpreter in institutional meetings: difficulties, “shared known” and tactics

During the communicative event, the interpreter has to manage the “shared known”. The speaker adapts his message to the receptor’s degree of knowledge (Seleskovitch, 1968). When the orator and the receptor are experts on a subject, the message will be more implicit. Nevertheless, during international professional meetings, the interpreter is an inexperienced person. So, when he translates these situations, he has to deal with linguistic (vocabulary) and extra-linguistic difficulties (context and “shared known”). With his Effort Models for Simultaneous interpreting, Gile (1985, 2009) considers the interpretation as a succession of Efforts (reception, memory, production) which requires attentional resources. Nevertheless, working close to the cognitive saturation (tightrope hypothesis), when one of these efforts needs more resources, the interpretation cannot perform adequately. So, when the interpreter encounters comprehension’s problems, the effort model is perturbed. First, we will present an overview of the existing theories about the difficulties interpreters have to face during the reception effort (vocabulary and “shared known” problems) and the tactics they use to keep on interpreting. Then, we will present the Interpretive Translation Theory (Seleskovitch and Lederer, 1968, 1989, 2001) which clarifies the notions of equivalence and correspondence in interpretation. Afterwards, we will use Pointurier’s researches about lexical gaps in sign language interpretation. And finally, we will present Gile’s Models (Effort Model, Gravitational Model…) to better understand the difficulties of interpreters when they work, and the tactics they use to face these problems. How sign language interpreters deal with this “shared known” they don’t understand? What tactics they use to still translate while preserving the communication? We will base our reflection on the analysis of a questionnaire of sign language interpreters who frequently translate during institutional meetings. Analyzing the answers of the professionals, we will highlight the difficulties have to manage and the power of the “shared known” on the interpreter’s comprehension. This will help us to enlighten the tactics used by the professionals to preserve the issue of the communication.

Saturday, 15th Sept

DESIGNS: Perspectives on Deaf people’s access to employment through interpreters

There is a direct link between education, educational qualifications, advancement into the labour market and social inclusion. Apart from financial autonomy, work and paid employment serves to develop a sense of belonging with positive mental health benefits and identification with the wider community (National Disability Authority, 2005). The overall point is that deaf people in Europe as well as throughout the world, continue to face barriers in employment.

The overall aim of the on-going European DESIGNS project (funded by Erasmus+) is to create vocational education and training and continuing professional development training resources and exchange best practices across Europe to facilitate greater participation of Deaf sign language users in employment. Seven partners from four European countries who are experts in the fields of Education and Training, Employment, Sign Language Interpreting and Deaf Community Advocacy are involved in this project.

In the first phase of the DESIGNS project, four data sets concerning Deaf people’s access to employment through interpreters have been carried out: (1) a European-wide online survey on Deaf employment, (2) review of previous findings on Deaf employment, (3) focus groups and interviews with Deaf employees from various public and private sectors in Ireland, Scotland, and Germany; and (4) focus groups and interviews with interpreters in Ireland, Scotland, and Germany.

This paper will focus on findings from data sets (3) and (4) and provide an overview of the successes and challenges outlined by deaf sign language users and interpreters in the employment context. This project is a work-in–progress, so we will conclude with some key recommendations for the development of training materials and resources for deaf people, interpreters and employers and our future plans. The question-answer session will focus on drawing examples from participants from their countries about whether they find the same issues that we have identified.

Lorraine Leeson (Ireland)

Lorraine Leeson (Ireland)

is Professor of Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin. Her research in the field of linguistics and applied linguistics (including interpreting studies) is widely published.

Haaris Sheikh (Ireland)

Haaris Sheikh (Ireland)

is Chief Executive of Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited and Adjunct Assistant Professor and PhD student in Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin. He is Chair of the DESIGNS project.

Christian Rathmann (Germany)

Christian Rathmann (Germany)

is Professor of Deaf Studies and Interpreting at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. He is a leading researcher in sign linguistics, sign language teaching and assessment, and sign language interpreting (for deaf and hearing interpreters).

Chris Peters (Germany)

Chris Peters (Germany)

is an accredited interpreter and translator for German Sign Language and International Sign and a lecturer in the Department for Deaf Studies and Sign Language Interpreting at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin as well as a former president of efsli.

Audrey Cameron (UK)

Audrey Cameron (UK)

is a postdoctoral research associate on the DESIGNS project in the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies at Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh.

Jemina Napier (UK)

Jemina Napier (UK)

is Chair of Intercultural Communication in the Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, and is a leading researcher in sign language interpreting.

John Bosco Conama (Ireland)

John Bosco Conama (Ireland)

is a lecturer in Deaf Studies and co-director of the Centre for Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin. He has research interests in deaf history and sign language rights.

Lucia Venturi (Ireland)

Lucia Venturi (Ireland)

is a research assistant on the DESIGNS project in the Centre for Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin, where she is also undertaking a masters degree.

Mark Wheatley (Belgium)

Mark Wheatley (Belgium)

has operated as the Executive Director of the European Union of the Deaf (EUD) since 2007. He is co-author of the EUD book “Sign Language Legislation in the European Union” (2012).

Frankie Picron (Belgium)

Frankie Picron (Belgium)

is the project officer of the European Union of the Deaf who has completed a masters in Law. As project officer he works as accessibility expert for the NEXES project, and collects data and disseminates information for the DESIGNS project.

Ivana Bućko (Serbia)

Ivana Bućko (Serbia)

is President of the European Forum of Sign Language Interpreters and is a practicing sign language interpreter based in Serbia.

Marinella Salami (Italy)

Marinella Salami (Italy)

is Executive Director of the European Forum of Sign Language Interpreters and is a practicing sign language interpreter and trainer based in Italy.

Caroline McGrotty (Ireland)

Caroline McGrotty (Ireland)

is coordinator of the graduate internship programme at AHEAD Ireland.

Challenges for sign language interpreting in employment settings in Moscow

The paper of three co-presenters will try to analyse the current situation with the role of SL interpreting during the employment process, in everyday situation at the employment settings, and in solving conflicts including payment, changing duties, inter-personnel communication, firing, quitting jobs, etc. The authors will briefly discuss the economic, social and psychological problems for deaf employees during the transition between full employment at sheltered workshops (factories) 30 years ago to unemployment and sometimes illegal businesses in the nineties and then to free employment market and high competition in big cities in Russia. The data of various interpreting situations mainly from the Moscow enterprises: small businesses, factories with big groups of deaf workers, famous chain-shops will be analysed. The employees and job applicants are deaf and hard-of-hearing people with different educational and professional backgrounds from different parts of Russia and ex-Soviet countries. The paper will provide statistic data with examples of various cases and anonymous information from deaf people’s questionnaires and their view on the role of SLI.

Anna Komarova (Russia)

Anna Komarova (Russia)

graduated from the Moscow State Linguistic University in 2016 as RSL and English interpreter. The university thesis dealt with RSL morphology. Worked in various interpreting settings including a metal workshop with a group of more than 100 deaf people, Works as a SLI in a Moscow vocational college. Has experience in working with deaf-blind clients at international conferences.

Ekaterina Golovanova (Russia)

Ekaterina Golovanova (Russia)

graduated from the Moscow State Linguistic University in 2016 as RSL and English interpreter. The university thesis dealt with RSL morphology. Worked in various interpreting settings including a metal workshop with a group of more than 100 deaf people, Works as a SLI in a Moscow vocational college. Has experience in working with deaf-blind clients at international conferences.

Liliya Ionichevskay (Russia)

Liliya Ionichevskay (Russia)

is CODA, RASLI President since 2009, worked as SLI and interpreters’ service coordinator in the Moscow Deaf association for 10 years. Since 2008 director of the Moscow City Interpreting service including distance interpreting. Has three university level degrees in medicine, law and SL interpreting. Member of municipal and governmental commissions on barrier free environment. Participated in development of the federal legislative acts on SL and interpreting. Happy mother of seven children and seven grandchildren.

Designated Interpreting in an Austrian Pharmacy: The Views of the parties concerned

This paper presents the results of a research study on the views of staff and customers of the only Austrian pharmacy employing a Deaf pharmacist who has regular contact with hearing customers via a designated interpreter. This piece of qualitative research will be conducted by practice researchers and will look for answers to the following questions:

  1. What does the Deaf professional expect of the designated interpreter? 2. In which situations does the Deaf professional use an interpreter in the internal communication with his co-workers who are semi-literate sign language users? 3. How do co-workers of a Deaf professional view the designated interpreter? 4. Does the designated interpreter influence the implicit hierarchy within a team of hearing and Deaf co-workers? (View of co-workers, Deaf professional) 5. How do hearing customers react to the presence of an interpreter in a communication/consultation with a Deaf health expert? 6. How do hearing customers view the role of the designated interpreter? 7. How does the owner of the pharmacy feel about the Deaf professional’s contribution and the presence of a free-lance interpreter in her pharmacy?
Patricia Bruck (Austria)

Patricia Bruck (Austria)

earned an M.A. Degree in Sign Language Interpreting (EUMASLI) after having completed her interpreting studies for spoken languages in the 1980s (Master of Philosophy). After having worked in different areas, she completed her education as a sign language interpreter. She has been working as a professional sign language interpreter for more than 17 years. Her area of expertise is educational interpreting from secondary level through vocational training to university lectures, conference interpreting, and political settings. She has been working as a designated interpreter since 2014. Her academic interest lies in team interpreting, gender issues in interpreting, health care interpreting, designated interpreting and the ethics of the profession.

Elke Schaumberger (Austria)

Elke Schaumberger (Austria)

Elke Schaumberger graduated with a M.A. in Sign Language Interpreting and Educational Sciences at the University of Graz (1998-2003). In 2002 Elke received her diploma as a Sign Language Interpreter (Austrian Sign Language / German) and became a member of the Austrian Association, ÖGSDV. After finishing her thesis in Leiden, the Netherlands, she worked at the department for Sign Language Interpreting at the Humboldt-University in Berlin for two years. Back in Austria, Elke set up her own business in Interpreting Services based in Vienna, Austria. She is working as a freelance sign language interpreter and trainer in Austria and abroad. She has gained expertise in different specialities over the last 15 years, including (inter)national conferences and events, academic and higher education, political and cultural events, designated interpreting and working with Deaf and hearing interpreters in a team. From 2007 till 2010 Elke was board member of the European Forum of Sign Language Interpreters (efsli).

Sunday, 16th Sept

Making it work: applying interpreters’ professional standards at high-level meetings

Conference interpreters, signed and spoken, work in a great range of high-level settings from international summits with (non)governmental bodies to politically oriented networking events. The interpreting demands in these settings are complex due to the participants’ multitude of languages and cultures, jargon, subject matter, and importance. The conference interpreter must match fluency, in multiple languages and cultures, with advanced skills and expertise in order to deliver a quality interpretation.

Considering the advanced expertise required of the interpreter, it is surprising that there is still a lack of awareness among clients, as well as among interpreters on the fundamental professional standards of conference interpreters. The professional standards lay out the working conditions the interpreters require in order to provide equal linguistic access for participants to a high-level environment. The conference interpreter has the responsibility, in consultation and cooperation with the clients, to ensure these professional standards are met by the contracting party. The professional standards specify among other things the technical requirements (e.g., audio and video), the working hours, number of interpreters per team, and travel times.

This presentation and discussion aims to raise awareness among interpreters and clients on their rights to demand, respectively, good working conditions and linguistic access, as stipulated in formal international agreements. Such agreements are negotiated between the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC) and international institutions such as the European Parliament and Commission and the United Nations.

Recognizing and applying these professional standards will especially assist linguistic minorities, such as users of signed languages, in furthering their position in society. In this way the language and cultural rights of sign language users are equally acknowledged at high-level meetings. It is our responsibility as conference interpreters to educate ourselves as well as other stakeholders regarding these agreements and encourage colleagues to adopt these professional standards.

Maya de Wit (The Netherlands)

Maya de Wit (The Netherlands)

is a certified sign language interpreter whose working languages include IS, NGT, ASL, as well as English, German, and Dutch. She has extensive experience in interpreting in conference settings and high-level meetings. She also delivers training and consultancy on topics such as optimizing the cooperation between consumers and spoken and sign language interpreters, raising professional standards, and interpreting techniques for high-level settings. In 2011 Maya obtained her MSc in the European Master of Sign Language Interpreting (EUMASLI). As of 1 February 2018 she is a PhD candidate at Radboud University, Nijmegen in the Netherlands, looking at International Sign interpreters working at international conferences. She was the first sign language interpreter to become a member of AIIC and currently she is the coordinator of the global AIIC Sign Language Network (SLN).

Holding the Reins: Coordinating BSL Interpreting at Scotland’s National Advisory Group

This presentation will describe the challenges of coordinating a team of interpreters for a series of high level Scottish Government all-day meetings between Deaf BSL (British Sign Language) users, and members of public bodies on the National Advisory Group. Deaf BSL users were recruited to the National Advisory Group to advise Scottish Ministers on the creation of Scotland’s first BSL National Plan, recently published in both English and BSL.

The Deaf BSL users were recruited from a variety of backgrounds across Scotland. Many of them from the ‘grassroots’ Deaf community, and none had ever worked at this level before. There were three young deaf people, two deaf blind BSL users, one of whom required BSL visual frame interpreting and the other ‘hands on’ interpreting, and four other BSL users. Eight interpreters including myself as coordinator worked at these day long meetings where discussions took place between these Deaf representatives and hearing representatives from various public bodies, government departments, and government ministers.

I will describe the linguistic challenges and translation decisions that we made as interpreters working with a variety of dialects and new vocabulary in both English and BSL. Also

the preparation strategies we used to ready ourselves for these meetings where we worked both into and out of BSL, since every meeting was co–chaired by a hearing person and a deaf or deafblind co-chair.

In addition to this there were a number of ethical dilemmas that occurred in these meetings that were often deciding the future direction of BSL policy in Scotland, compounded by the fact there was no one representing the interpreting profession on the advisory group. By working collaboratively with everyone involved, and having the opportunity to provide feedback on issues after each meeting, we were able to interpret successfully despite the many demands upon us.

Yvonne Waddell (UK)

Yvonne Waddell (UK)

is a freelance BSL/English Interpreter based in Scotland. She has a keen interest in professional development and also works as a lecturer in BSL/English Interpreting at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh. She mentors novice interpreters, provides CPD training and often works as a coordinator for teams of interpreters for large events. Her doctoral research at Heriot-Watt University focuses on how hearing mental health nurses can build a therapeutic relationship with Deaf patients via an interpreter.

What if both are hired? – A look at team work between interpreters

A good working team of interpreters is essential in all situations and for deaf professionals in particular. It’s useful therefore to consider some of the variables that influence creating a good working team. As there are numerous determining factors, we would like to focus on the part of the „non-active“ co-interpreter, as this seems to be a field with many unanswered questions. What are the most efficient ways to support the “active” interpreter? What facilitates such support? When are you correcting and when are you just giving alternative phrasing? When is it just a question of style? Is there a target language that gets correcting more than others and if so why? The effect of feeling “safe” and “acknowledged” is important in this part of the team work and an atmosphere of mutual appreciation is greatly beneficial. Anticipation of what your team partner may need and ways that this support can be provided are essential in ensuring that a good and accurate service is provided. We would like to take a closer look at the effects of a stable team working together regularly, e.g. employed interpreters, versus teams in which the members may be changeable. Some answers were given by a talk during EFSLI 2015, Warsaw, Poland, from Shaurna Dickson and Paul Belmonte: “How do you like to be fed?” and Hoza, Jack (2010) Team Interpreting. As Collaboration and Interdependence. We hope to discuss some ideas during the panel and welcome deaf interpreters for sharing know-how of co-working.

Sigrid Jacobs (Germany)

Sigrid Jacobs (Germany)

has been a sign language interpreter since 1996. She took part in one of the pioneering education programs at the University of Hamburg, Germany, to gain a diploma degree in sign language interpreting. Her thesis considered how “neutral” interpreters might work and since then is convinced that it is better to acknowledge gaps rather than denying them. From 1998 until Spring 2018 she was employed as an interpreter at the University of Hamburg. In April 2018 she commenced work at the Humboldt-University, Berlin, where she continues to interpret for deaf professionals and has begun giving lessons for prospective interpreters.

Tanja Plankensteiner (Germany)

Tanja Plankensteiner (Germany)

sign language interpreter (B.A.) since 2011, studied in Magdeburg/Germany. Firstly worked as an employee for a sign language interpreting company in Munich. 2014 moved back to Magdeburg, starting to teach sign language interpreting at Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Science in part-time permanent position and also working as a sign language interpreter. In 2016 she started to be a full-time freelancer, but still having lectureships at the university. Since she is working at the university her focus is interpreting from German Sign Language into spoken German.

sign language interpreter (B.A.) since 2011, studied in Magdeburg/Germany. Firstly worked as an employee for a sign language interpreting company in Munich. 2014 moved back to Magdeburg, starting to teach sign language interpreting at Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Science in part-time permanent position and also working as a sign language interpreter. In 2016 she started to be a full-time freelancer, but still having lectureships at the university. Since she is working at the university her focus is interpreting from German Sign Language into spoken German.

Designated Interpreting – Navigating Medicine, Science and Research in a Medical Center

Deaf individuals in some disciplines are advancing to secure significant employment roles in today’s workplace. In some countries, this advancement is happening at such a quick pace that interpreters are struggling to keep up with the level of knowledge, responsibility, and skill that is required to interpret in these newer educational and employment settings. One response to this service challenge has been to create designated interpreter and deaf professional teams (Hauser and Hauser, 2008). Such has been the preferred approach as the deaf professional population has grown at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) in Rochester, New York.  For the last thirty years, the URMC has found itself in a unique position to educate and employee a growing number of the US’s deaf professional population.

Members of the designated interpreter team who have worked alongside deaf biomedical students and professionals from nursing, public health, and medicine were interviewed. Their experiences working with these deaf professionals (and their colleagues) in various settings such as clinical, surgical, lectures, laboratories, national conferences, and international travel for field research will be summarized and shared.

Tiffany Taylor (USA)

Tiffany Taylor (USA)

graduated from Gallaudet University with her Bachelors in Interpreting in 2015 before obtaining NIC in 2016. She will graduate with her Master of Science in Health Care Interpreting from the Rochester Institute of Technology in May 2018. Tiffany began working at the University of Rochester two years ago as a designated interpreter with a deaf professional obtaining a PhD in Biomedical Science. Since that time she has also worked closely with MD/PhD students, post-doctoral fellows, and established researchers in disciplines ranging from basic to behavioral sciences and clinical to public health fields.

Workshops

Working with Deaf Professionals – The Client/Boss relationship.  Can it work?

This workshop will focus on the relationship between Deaf professionals in the workplace and their interpreters.  We will look at a summary of findings from research conducted in 2010 with Helen Gillespie, a Deaf social worker, which looked at views of these relationships and was updated last year with some additional thoughts when Caron ran a webinar with LinguistPD. We will look at some of the highs and lows based on quotes from the research and think about positive solutions to work based issues.  We will also discuss the interpersonal and intrapersonal dynamics around working with clients in their professional domains. This will be an interactive workshop so come prepared to do some work!

Caron says: “We learn from our mistakes and my increasing years have led me to believe that the only way we can successfully work, is to ensure our reflective practice never ceases.  Only by talking about our work as interpreters can we be held accountable and ultimately find satisfaction and a sense of confidence in what we do, for both ourselves and Deaf people in the workplace.  After all, we all want to enjoy our work, don’t we?”

Caron Wolfenden (UK)

Caron Wolfenden (UK)

is a sign language interpreter with over 20 years of experience working in London and rural Devon, both in community and professional settings.  She trains, assesses, mentors and supervises interpreters and is constantly seeking ways to make our work open for discussion.  She has previously presented at ASLI, efsli and WASLI conferences. Prior to interpreting Caron had a career in the financial services based in London, but had known from childhood that she wanted to work with Deaf people. Outside of work she travels, gardens, practices yoga and lives with her husband and two cats in the countryside.

Deaf professionals and interpreters: A match made in heaven – or making it work?

There are an increasing number of deaf professionals working at different knowledge-based work places, where sign language is not the dominant language. While their written voice is their own, for collaboration with colleagues, presenting and networking they work with interpreters. In these situations, apart from a few exceptions, the deaf professional is likely to have a better command of the discourse and terminology than the interpreter. As two professionals, both have a shared responsibility to make the situation work, but this co-operation also presents certain challenges for both the deaf professional and the interpreter. Interpreters are instrumental to deaf professionals’ professional life, but may also be an obstacle if there is mismatch between the deaf professional and the interpreter, or when the professional and interpreter are not sure about how they can work together (Bristoll, 2009; Feyne, 2015).

This workshop is aimed to be a participatory discussion and will cover questions such as:

  • How can deaf professionals and interpreters develop good and effective working relationships?
  • How can deaf professionals and interpreters cope with the realities they are confronted with, e.g. general lower level of education of interpreters, no designated interpreters, national sign language interpreters often not highly proficient in English, lack of qualified interpreters etc.
  • How can the deaf academic and interpreter actively contribute to making a joint role-space (Llewellyn-Jones & Lee, 2013; Llewellyn-Jones & Lee, 2014) where the deaf academic is presented both genuine and credible ?
  • How can deaf academics and interpreters “match” and what constitutes a good match?

As outcomes, we aim for the participants to have more confidence and more awareness around building working relationships, and as such advance both deaf professionals’ careers and the interpreting profession.

Hilde Haualand (Norway)

Hilde Haualand (Norway)

is a social anthropologist and associate professor at the sign language and interpreting trainer programme at OsloMet. She has worked at a contract research institute since 2001, and her doctoral dissertation focused on the politics of video interpreting (2012). During her Post Doc at NTNU, she explored sign language interpreting as a profession in the welfare state. She is currently editing a book on sign language interpreters as language workers and as professionals (Haualand, Nilsson & Raanes, forthcoming 2018).

Vibeke Bø (Norway)

Vibeke Bø (Norway)

is an interpreter, interpreter trainer and linguist. She has been working as an interpreter since 2004, and as an interpreter trainer since 2011. Her MA thesis from 2010 explores a syntactic construction in Norwegian Sign Language (NTS), Verb Sandwich Constructions. In the period 2009-2011, she was part of the commitee of ethics within the Norwegian Association of Interpreters (NAI). From 2007 through 2010 she was also the leader of a local group of NAI. In collaboration with collegues from NTNU, she was the project leader of establishing a corpus of NTS. This project began in 2014 and is currently ongoing.

Designated Interpreters -needs, demands and presuppositions in European countries

In many countries, the environmental and educational situation for Deaf people has improved. There is an increasing number of Deaf Professionals (DPs) who work in highly specialized fields such as medicine, law, and engineering. Accordingly, there is a growing need for Designated Interpreters (DIs) with a unique skill set and with the willingness to adapt to a career specialism.

The concept of a DP-DI-relationship is already advanced in the US. In Germany, finding a DP-DI-pair is, for many reasons, however rather „exotic”. It is not uncommon that students at German universities, including Universities of Applied Sciences where most of the sign language training takes place, have not ‘heard’ of DIs, despite the growing interest in their role. Though there definitively is a need for specialized interpreters and functioning concepts for DIs, many Deaf Professionals are also not aware of the possibilities of the teamwork which DP-DI pairs provide.

The aim of this workshop is to explore the needs and future demand of sign language qualifications in the workplace setting. Using the DP-DI-relationship between Dr Irmhild Rogalla und Katharina Cordts as a case-study, we intend to establish what the DP-DI-idea means to them and how it benefits both of them. It throws up the issue which circles of sign language users could be team partners and future Deaf Professionals. Following this, we intend to open up a discussion about whether this new paradigm of work could fit the audiences’ fields of expertise, are we speaking of different levels, like ‘designated’, ‘preferred’, ‘external’, what pre-requisites and requirements are needed for the role of a DI, which techniques and strategies DIs need to adopt and how successful DI-DP-relationships can be further developed in different countries.

Katharina Cordts (Germany)

Katharina Cordts (Germany)

studied Sign-Language Interpreting at Zwickau University of Applied Sciences and graduated in 2008. After graduation, she worked in a team of designated interpreters for lecturers at Humboldt University‘s department of Deaf Studies until 2012. In 2014, Katharina became Dr Irmhild Rogalla’s designated interpreter. In the course of their working relationship, they began to review the issue of Deaf Professionals and the role of their Designated Interpreters.

Kristin Pelikan (Germany)

Kristin Pelikan (Germany)

graduated in 2013, receiving a BA degree in Deaf Studies from Humboldt-University, Berlin. She continued her studies at the same institution with a Master in Sign Language Interpreting, completing it in 2018. Her MA dissertation presents a linguistic perspective of the interpreters work for Dr Rogalla. She joined the team of Dr Rogalla’s interpreters in 2017.

‘Great expectations’: Do interpreted job interviews affect the employability opportunities of Deaf candidates?

Trotter argues that: “The labour market is a challenging place for disabled people. The difficulties faced by everyone … are exacerbated by the additional barriers disabled people face.” (2013:35). This workshop will explore the potential barriers, that can be identified when using a sign language interpreter during an employment interview process.

Within this extensive study, two stakeholder groups, namely, Deaf interviewees and Sign language interpreters were interviewed in depth, about their personal experiences and the challenges they faced during the interview process. The latter also interpreted a simulated real-time employment interview, in order to monitor and evaluate the participation of a sign language interpreter in the setting.

A third stakeholder group namely interview panel members, were consulted as to their perceptions of, and the decisions they made, concerning the Deaf candidate, when faced with a sign language interpreter mediated employment interview. This was conducted via a matched-guise technique variant (Lambert et.al. 1960), where several sign language interpreters voiced over a single Deaf candidate.,

The workshop will examine whether:

  1. The prosodic features of sign language interpreters have the potential to influence the selection decisions made by interview panels?
  2. Translation decisions and the alignment utilised by sign language interpreters, impact upon a Deaf interviewees chances of successful selection?
  3. The training of sign language interpreters can be enhanced, to improve the experiences for all stakeholders, within interviews involving Deaf participants?

There is a need to establish guidelines in this specific domain for all stakeholder groups

Sarah Bown (UK)

Sarah Bown (UK)

Senior Lecturer for the B.A (Hons) Interpreting: BSL/English programme at the University of Wolverhampton, UK.  Her professional expertise spans over three decades incorporating:  interpreting, Higher education of interpreters, pedagogical research, management of interpreting services, and extensive experience of service delivery and training within private, public and charitable sectors.  As Course Leader from 1999-2016, she led the above programme to the highest level of professional body recognition and registration.  A member of the efsli eCE, Higher Education Academy Senior Fellow & Academic Associate, QCF Assessor/Verifier and given the Vice Chancellor’s award for recognition of teaching innovation and excellence.

Kristiaan Dekesel (UK)

Kristiaan Dekesel (UK)

Principal Lecturer for the B.A (Hons) Interpreting: (BSL/English) at the University of Wolverhampton, UK and Head of Undergraduate recruitment for the Faculty of Social Sciences.  He has been involved in the training of interpreters for nearly three decades.  Kristiaan has been instrumental in the curriculum design and innovation of undergraduate programmes in Higher Education and has actively campaigned for the access to BSL as a national curriculum subject in the education system for both deaf and hearing children.  He is one of only a handful of sign linguists in the UK

Poster presentations

text here

Top